FANDOM


1lewis carroll

Lewis Carroll

Lewis Carroll Biography

  • Birth Date: January 27, 1832
  • Birth Place: Daresbury, Cheshire
  • Death: January 14, 1898
  • Birth Name: Charles Lutwidge Dodgson

As a child Lewis Carroll attended Richmond School, Yorkshire from 1844-1855. Then he attended Rugby School during the years 1846-1850. During those four years he endured many illnesses. One of these left him partially deaf in one ear. For further education, Lewis Carroll went to Christ Church, Oxford. Here he studied mathematics and worked as a lecturer. He suffered, however, from a bad stutter that caused him great difficulty in teaching and lecturing. Under the name of Charles L. Dodgson (the name he used for his academic works) he published various books on mathematics including Euclid and his Modern Rivals.

Lewis Carroll is perhaps most known for his works of Alice in Wonderland. However before Alice, Lewis Carroll wrote a number of poems ranging from humorous to more serious. The earliest of his works appeared anonymous, but in March of 1856, a poem titled "Solitude" was published using the pen name of Lewis Carroll. He decided upon his pen name by starting with his birth name, Charles Lutwidge. He then proceeded to translate them into Latin and had "Carolus Ludovicus". From there he reversed the names and translated them back into English.

Lewis Carroll and his family were very close friends with the Liddell family. Lewis Carroll would frequently make up stories for young Alice Liddell and her sisters. On July 4, 1862 during a picnic with the Liddell girls Lewis Carroll made up a long fairytale about a young girl who fell into a rabbit hole and had many adventures. Alice Liddell asked for him to write the story down for her, and so he did originally titling it Alice's Adventures Under Ground. After some revisions the story was published with the new title Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. As he was encouraged by the success of the book, he published the sequel Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Found There. This book contained many of his earlier poems which he had written before he had begun to tell the tales to the Liddell girls.

As well as writing Lewis Carroll took an interest in photography. He found he most liked taking pictures of children. however as well as children he did take many of famous adults of the time. However by 1880 Lewis Carroll gave up photography as he thought it was taking up too much of his time and he could find a way for this time to be better spent.

Thoughts On Control and Leadership

Lewis Carroll has various poems that could be referenced to his thoughts on control and leadership. While many are about the person in control and at first look seem to be quite fond of the one in such power, if one looks a little deeper they may find that there is more to the control that is disliked than liked. Lewis Carroll does not believe in others being in control and leading everyone their way, one instead, should be free to do as they wish in their own ways.

The first example of this can be shown using the poem The Jabberwocky. This poem is full of nonsense words that when read aloud the sounds can create the story. In the opening stanza of the poem this is shown the best "'Twas brillig, and the slithy toves/did gyre and gimble in the wabe:/All mimsy were the borogoves/And he mome raths outgrabe" (The Jabberwocky, Carroll). Upon first glance the poem makes no sense. It goes on however to discuss the mythical creature called the Jabberwocky and the boy who had it slain. Lewis Carroll continues to write this tale with words that cannot be found in the dictionary. This is showing the freedom that people should be able to have. Why should one stay within the confines of a dictionary to write something when it can be done another way. There is no need to be help in and conform, when one can go about things in their own way and start their own trend. You can break through the control and be your own person.

Lewis Carroll also believes that when you place your complete trust in a figure in control, it will come back to get you later. This is best seen in The walrus and the Carpenter. In the beginning of the poem the Walrus and the Carpenter come along some oysters, they proceed to lure them away from their bed and the pysters trust in them. The Walrus and the Carpenter then eat all of the helpless oysters:

O Oysters,' said the Carpenter,
'You've had a pleasant run!
Shall we be trotting home again?'
But answer came there none --
And this was scarcely odd, because
They'd eaten every one. (The Walrus and the Carpenter, Carroll)

It has been thought that this poem is relating to religion. People are willing to put their faith into someone or something and it turns around and metaphorically eats them. It doesn't matter what it is that the people do they cannot win. The same argument could be made if Lewis Carroll were instead of religion talking about the government. They say that they will do one thing but as soon as you trust them and let them have power, they do another thing. They have this leadership that everyone follows, again, this would be an issue of conformity. However if one were to break away from the leadership they would find the control back in their own hands. Lewis Carroll does not believe that you should follow a leader, or someone who thinks they can control you.

As you read more of lewis Carroll's poems it become more and more apparent that he did not like leadership or control. Lewis Carroll very much believed that everyone should be free to think for themselves and take their own paths. there is no need for conformity if you can do something in your own way. it is better to stray from the generally taken path to discover something on you own than just to do as told by someone of authority.

Poems Analysis

The Walrus and The Carpenter .................................................................. Analysis

The sun was shining on the sea, .................................................. Stanza 1: the meaning, the sun is shining very brightly even though it is suppose to be the
Shining with all his might: .......................................................................... middle of the night
He did his very best to make ..................................................................... personification, "he did his very best" referring to the sun as if it is a person
The billows smooth and bright -- ................................................................ paradox, the sun is out in the middle of the night
And this was odd, because it was
The middle of the night.

The moon was shining sulkily, ........................................................ Stanza 2: the meaning, the moon is upset because the sun is still there, it's rude to be there
Because she thought the sun ........................................................................ when it is no longer your turn or your job
Had got no business to be there .................................................................... personification, the moon is talking and thinking
After the day was done -- .............................................................................. alliteration, day was done, makes the sound appealing
'It's very rude of him.' she said,
'To come and spoil the fun!'

The sea was wet as wet could be, ................................................. Stanza 3: the meaning, the sea is wet and the sand is dry, there are no clouds in the sky and
The sands were dry as dry. .......................................................................... there are no birds around, it is a strange day/night on the beach
You could not see a cloud, because ............................................................. alliteration, "was wet as wet" "could not see a cloud" "dry as dry"
No cloud was in the sky:
No birds were flying overhead --
There were no birds to fly.

The Walrus and the Carpenter ...................................................... Stanza 4: the meaning, there's a walrus and a carpenter walking together along the beach and
Were walking close at hand: ....................................................................... they don't like all the sand, they are thinking the beach would be better without it
They wept like anything to see .................................................................... alliteration, "were walking"
Such quantities of sand: ............................................................................. simile "wept like anything"
'If this were only cleared away,'
They said, 'it would be grand.'

'If seven maids with seven mops ................................................. Stanza 5: the meaning, the walrus suggests that maybe seven girls could sweep away the sand
Swept it for half a year, ............................................................................ for six months to get rid of it all, but the carpenter doesn't think it would help
Do you suppose,' the Walrus said, ........................................................... synesthesia, "shed a bitter tear"
'That they could get it clear?' .................................................................... alliteration, "seven maids with seven mops/swept" the letter s, and the letter m
'l doubt it,' said the Carpenter, .................................................................. paradox, sweeping the sand off of the beach
And shed a bitter tear.

'O Oysters, come and walk with us! ................................................ Stanza 6: the meaning, the walrus finds some oysters and invites them to com and walk with
The Walrus did beseech. .......................................................................... them and talk with them, but they can only bring four along so that each of them can
'A pleasant walk, a pleasant talk, ............................................................... have a hand to hold
Along the briny beach: .............................................................................. alliteration, "o oysters" "briny beach"
We cannot do with more than four,
To give a hand to each.'

The eldest Oyster looked at him, ................................................. Stanza 7: the meaning, the oldest oyster just shook his head and determined he was not going
But never a word he said: ........................................................................... to leave the safety and follow the walrus and the carpenter's leadership
The eldest Oyster winked his eye, .............................................................. alliteration "his heavy head"
And shook his heavy head -- ....................................................................... hyperbole, his head was not literally heavy
Meaning to say he did not choose
To leave the oyster-bed.

Out four young Oysters hurried up. ................................................... Stanza 8: the meaning, four oysters hurried and were excited to go with them, they were all
All eager for the treat: ..................................................................................... clean and tidy and excited to follow the leaders
Their coats were brushed, their faces washed, .................................................. paradox, they have shoes but no feet
Their shoes were clean and neat -- .................................................................. assonance, "clean and neat"
And this was odd, because, you know,
They hadn't any feet.

Four other Oysters followed them, ................................................ Stanza 9: the meaning, eight more oysters followed the original four, then more and more kept
And yet another four; ................................................................................. joining them, they all followed after the two in control, they walked through the waves
And thick and fast they came at last, ......................................................... and hurried to get to the shore
And more, and more, and more -- .............................................................. repetition "more and more and more" stresses how many there are
All hopping through the frothy waves, ......................................................... assonance, 'hopping' and 'frothy'
And scrambling to the shore.

The Walrus and the Carpenter .................................................... Stanza 10: the meaning, they all walked on for about a mile and then the walrus and the
Walked on a mile or so, .............................................................................. carpenter stopped to take a rest and the oysters were waiting
And then they rested on a rock .................................................................... alliteration, "rested on a rock"
Conveniently low: ........................................................................................ assonance "then they rested" repetition of the 'e' sound
And all the little Oysters stood
And waited in a row.

'The time has come,' the Walrus said, ........................................ Stanza 11: the meaning, the walrus has decided it's time to talk about important philosophical
'To talk of many things: .............................................................................. type things
Of shoes -- and ships -- and sealing wax -- .................................................. hyperbole, he sea is not literally boiling hot
Of cabbages -- and kings -- ........................................................................ alliteration, "shoes and ships and sealing wax" "cabbages and kings"
And why the sea is boiling hot --
And whether pigs have wings.'

'But wait a bit,' the Oysters cried, ............................................. Stanza 12: the meaning, the oysters want to wait a bit before they talk because they are fat and
'Before we have our chat; .......................................................................... out of breath, the carpenter tell them there's no hurry and the oysters thank him
For some of us are out of breath, ............................................................... irony, he oysters say they are fat and out of breath, perfect condition to be eaten in
And all of us are fat!' ................................................................................. but yet they think nothing of telling the walrus and the carpenter whom they just met
'No hurry!' said the Carpenter. .................................................................... alliteration "they thanked him much for that" 'th' sound
They thanked him much for that.

'A loaf of bread,' the Walrus said, .............................................. Stanza 13: the meaning, the walrus says to bring he bread and pepper and vinegar so they can
'Is what we chiefly need: ........................................................................... start to feed
Pepper and vinegar besides ...................................................................... pun, the walrus tells the oysters they can begin to feel, but he means the carpenter
Are very good indeed -- ............................................................................ and himself upon the oysters
Now, if you're ready, Oysters dear,
We can begin to feed.'

'But not on us!' the Oysters cried, ............................................ Stanza 14: the meaning, the oysters are crying not to feed on them and telling the walrus it
Turning a little blue. ................................................................................. be very kind of him after all the kindness, the walrus tries to change the subject
'After such kindness, that would be
A dismal thing to do!'
'The night is fine,' the Walrus said,
'Do you admire the view?'

'It was so kind of you to come! ................................................ Stanza 15: the meaning, the walrus thanks them for coming to be their meal, and the carpenter
And you are very nice!' ............................................................................ seems to not care at all as he just asks for more bread
The Carpenter said nothing but ................................................................ pun, nice could be nice as in kind, or nice to eat
'Cut us another slice- .............................................................................. connotation, "i wish you were not so deaf...." the carpenter gives a feeling of being
I wish you were not quite so deaf- ............................................................ even though he hasn't out right said anything overly so
I've had to ask you twice!'

'It seems a shame,' the Walrus said, ....................................... Stanza 16: the meaning, the walrus feels a little guilty about the trick they've played on the
'To play them such a trick. ...................................................................... oysters, the carpenter brushes it off and says the butter is too thick
After we've brought them out so far, .......................................................... connotation, the carpenter's simple words seem bitter
And made them trot so quick!'
The Carpenter said nothing but
'The butter's spread too thick!'

'I weep for you,'the Walrus said: ............................................. Stanza 17: the meaning, the walrus is truly upset by the trick they played and starts crying,
'I deeply sympathize.' ............................................................................ despite this he continues to sort them out by size anyways
With sobs and tears he sorted out .......................................................... irony, it seemed originally his idea and now he's crying and genuinely remorseful for
Those of the largest size, ...................................................................... what he is about to do
Holding his pocket-handkerchief
Before his streaming eyes.

'O Oysters,' said the Carpenter, ............................................. Stanza 18: the meaning, the carpenter seems in denial and tries to ask the oysters if they should
'You've had a pleasant run! ..................................................................... going home, but he receives no answer because they'd eaten them all
Shall we be trotting home again?'
But answer came there none --
And this was scarcely odd, because
They'd eaten every one.


Brother And Sister ............................................................................ Analysis

"SISTER, sister, go to bed! ..................................................... Stanza 1: the meaning, the brother tells his sister to go to bed, tries to take control
Go and rest your weary head." ............................................................... all three lines are seven syllables per line, end of each line rhymes
Thus the prudent brother said.

"Do you want a battered hide, ................................................. Stanza 2: the meaning, the sister stands up for herself and fights back saying if he orders her
Or scratches to your face applied?" ........................................................ around she is going to hit him or scratch his face, again all three lines have seven
Thus his sister calm replied.................................................................... syllables and end rhymes, irony; her words sound harsh but she is speaking calmly

"Sister, do not raise my wrath................................................. Stanza 3: the meaning, brother tries to regain his control by threatening to turn her into broth
I'd make you into mutton broth .............................................................. hyperbole, the brother probably could not do this as easily as kill a moth, that's also a
As easily as kill a moth" ...................................................................... simile

The sister raised her beaming eye .......................................... Stanza 4: the meaning, the sister still won't give in to the attempt at control, and dares her brother
And looked on him indignantly .............................................................. to try and cook her up
And sternly answered, "Only try!"

Off to the cook he quickly ran ................................................ Stanza 5: the meaning, the brother runs to the cook and asks for a frying pan to cook his sister
"Dear Cook, please lend a frying-pan ..................................................... assonance "as quickly as you can" the 'a' sound
To me as quickly as you can."

And wherefore should I lend it you?" ....................................... Stanza 6: the meaning, the cook asks why she should lend the pan to him and he says so he can
"The reason, Cook, is plain to view. ....................................................... make an Irish stew
I wish to make an Irish stew."

"What meat is in that stew to go?" .......................................... Stanza 7: the meaning, the cook asks what is going in the stew and the brother tells her it's his
"My sister'll be the contents!" ................................................................. sister, she refuses to give him the pan
"Oh" ..................................................................................................... irony, he said he could cook her easily, he insisted he was the one in power, the one
"You'll lend the pan to me, Cook?" .......................................................... with the control and then someone with actual control snubbed his idea
"No!"

Moral: Never stew your sister. ................................................ Conclusion: even when you think you are the one with power you may not be, and never stew your .............................................................................................................. sister


You Are Old Father William ................................................................................... Analysis

"You are old, father William," the young man said, .......................................... Stanza 1: the meaning, a young man and his father are talking, the man has white
"And your hair has become very white; .......................................................................... hair and likes to stand on his head, the young man is worried it's not
And yet you incessantly stand on your head -- ............................................................... good for him
Do you think, at your age, it is right?

"In my youth," father William replied to his son, .............................................. Stanza 2: the meaning, father William has determined it's okay to do this now
"I feared it might injure the brain; .................................................................................. he's sure he has no brain he can't injure it
But, now that I'm perfectly sure I have none, .................................................................. paradox, he says he's sure that he has no brain, but he's smart
Why, I do it again and again." ...................................................................................... enough to figure out it's okay to stand on his head since he has no brain

"You are old," said the youth, "as I mentioned before, ..................................... Stanza 3: the meaning, the young man doesn't know how the fat old man can do a
And you have grown most uncommonly fat; .................................................................. somersault so he inquires some more about it
Yet you turned a back-somersault in at the door -- ......................................................... assonance, "grown most uncommonly" the 'o' sound
Pray what is the reason for that?"

"In my youth," said the sage, as he shook his grey locks, ............................... Stanza 4: the meaning, father William says he was able to do this because he
"I kept all my limbs very supple .................................................................................... used an ointment on his limbs, he offers to sell the young man some
By the use of this ointment -- one shilling a box -- .......................................................... alliteration, "said the sage"
Allow me to sell you a couple?"

"You are old," said the youth, "and your jaws are too weak .............................. Stanza 5: the meaning, the young man again doubts the older man and asks how
For anything tougher than suet; .................................................................................... he was able to chew through everything, he assumes he is too weak
Yet you finished the goose, with the bones and the beak -- ............................................. assonance "how did you manage to do it" the 'o' sound
Pray, how did you mange to do it?"

"In my youth," said his father, "I took to the law, ............................................. Stanza 6: the meaning, the old man again proves himself by saying that when he
And argued each case with my wife; ............................................................................. was younger he argued with his wife and it gave his jaw strength, also
And the muscular strength, which it gave to my jaw, ...................................................... maybe he was a lawyer of some sort
Has lasted the rest of my life."

"You are old," said the youth, "one would hardly suppose ............................... Stanza 7: the meaning, the young man continues to questions the father about his
That your eye was as steady as every; ......................................................................... skills and again assumes his eyes aren't as good as they appear to be
Yet you balanced an eel on the end of your nose --
What made you so awfully clever?"

"I have answered three questions, and that is enough," ................................... Stanza 8: the meaning, the father says he has answered enough of his son's
Said his father. "Don't give yourself airs! ........................................................................ questions and that he is no better than himself, so he'd better leave
Do you think I can listen all day to such stuff? Be off or I'll kick you down stairs.

Despite the fact that father William is old he has kept himself up. He has grey hair and is fat, his eyes should not be as good as they are, and yet, they are. The young son decides to question father William about it. The young man appears to be the one in control of the conversation and at the end it all switches around when father William tells him not to give himself airs and that he'd better leave before he kicks him down stairs.


The Jabberwocky

'Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe:
All mimsy were the borogoves,
And the mome raths outgrabe.

'Beware the Jabberwock, my son!
The jaws that bite, the claws that catch!
Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun
The frumious Bandersnatch!'

He took his vorpal sword in hand:
Long time the manxome foe he sought --
So rested he by the Tumtum tree,
And stood a while in thought.

And, as in uffish thought he stood,
The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame,
Came whiffling through the tulgey wood,
And burbled as it came!

One two! One two! And through and through
The vorpal blade went snicker-snack!
He left it dead, and with its head
He went galumphing back.

'And hast thou slain the Jabberwock?
Come to my arms, my beamish boy!
Oh frabjous day! Callooh! Callay!'
He chortled in his joy.

'Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe:
All mimsy were the borogoves,
And the mome raths outgrabe.


Analysis

First off it is written with words that do not confine themselves to being found in a dictionary. This shows feeling on control and why should someone be confined to the conformity of a dictionary if there's another way to tell the story. Then there's the story itself of the person slaying the 'Jabberwocky'. This monster mad out to be big and ferocious, he decapitates it and someone else is calling him to their arms. The first three lines in every verse has eight syllables and the last line has six.

Works Cited Or Consulted

"Biography of Sir Lewis Carroll." Oracle Think Quest Education foundation. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Jan 2011. <http://library.thinkquest.org/10977/carroll/ >.

"Lewis Carrol." RefrenceAnswers. N.p., 2011. Web. 15 Jan 2011. <http://www.answers.com/topic/lewis-carroll>.

"Lewis Carrol." PoemHunter. N.p., 1/15/2011. Web. 15 Jan 2011. <http://www.poemhunter.com/lewis-carroll/poems/>.

Carrol, Lewis. The Jabberwocky, 1872.

Carrol, Lewis. You Are Old Father William, 1865.

Carrol, Lewis. Brother and Sister.

Carrol, Lewis. The Walrus and the Carpenter, 1872.

Liukkonen, Petri. "Lewis Carroll (1832-1898) - pseudonym of Charles Lutwidge Dodgson." N.p., 2008. Web. 15 Jan 2011. <http://kirjasto.sci.fi/lcarroll.htm>.

My Sonnet

Free

Why should we let someone else take control

Shouldn't we be free to make our own choices

To live how we feel deep down in our souls

Our decisions shine through with raised voices


You should make your own decisions and not

Let anyone else sway your opinion

Be your own person and form your own thought

Don't let them control you through a dominion


Do not follow what the others may say

And don't listen to what they are thinking

Be who you are and go on your own way

Don't leave room for control to start pranking


So be in control and do as you please

And you will find it is you who it frees

Video

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7hfFyGtbXwM That's the link to the video I mean to post here, but I'm not really sure if it entirely worked because I'm not overly great with technology.

thumb|left|300px|http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7hfFyGtbXwM

Latest activity

Ad blocker interference detected!


Wikia is a free-to-use site that makes money from advertising. We have a modified experience for viewers using ad blockers

Wikia is not accessible if you’ve made further modifications. Remove the custom ad blocker rule(s) and the page will load as expected.